Type 2 Diabetes – Reasons To Avoid Tanning Beds If You Are a Diabetic

Some people tan very easily in the sun after only a short period of time. Others tend to burn. Many people use tanning salons and beds to develop an artificial tan due to lack of time, or for personal preference.

Here are a few reasons to consider before tanning if you suffer from Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes:

1. Firstly, you need to understand what tanning actually does. In simple terms, it makes the color of your skin go darker than it already is. However, people have different skin types. Naturally, different races have skin types that may be affected differently. Caucasian people may have fair complexions or slightly darker ones. Skin may be oily or dry.

All of these factors have to be considered before deciding to get a tan, whether natural or artificial. Tanning beds can be very dangerous for diabetics because your whole body is subjected to intense UV rays. Even though it’s a controlled environment, if you have sores of any kind, they can become worse.

2. Many people with diabetes have some degree of nerve damage and won’t be able to feel if they are getting burned by the rays… until it’s too late. You can easily become dehydrated and that means your body won’t be able to process insulin and food as well as it normally could.

Tanning beds are less likely to cause sunburn than the real sun but it still can happen. It means your body has to focus on healing and, therefore, has a reduced capacity to fight off other problems such as infections and diseases.

It’s vital you speak to the tanning consultant to work out the best settings for the bed if you insist on tanning. Set a specific turn off time and ask the consultant to check on you as well, in case you’re not aware of problems.

3. Tanning can cause skin cancer, eye damage and premature aging if you don’t take adequate precautions. It’s also important not to tan too often as it can become addictive and then you may just ignore the health risks and have more problems as a result.

4. It’s also possible you may develop a rash if you are allergic to the ultraviolet light. There are plenty of ways to treat it, but it’s a strong indicator you should not use a tanning bed.

These are only a few of the reasons to avoid tanning if you suffer from diabetes. If you have any concerns at all, speak to your doctor first. You should also mention to the tanning consultant you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes… then proper safety measures can be taken.

Is Sushi Okay For Someone With Type 2 Diabetes?

Being diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes can come as a bit of a shock. In truth, news like that can really put you into a bit of a tailspin. You may not have an inkling of what type of ramifications that this would bring about for your day-to-day life. However, a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes is not nearly as dire as it may sound. In fact, by making a few simple adjustments to your diet and exercise program you can ensure that you will be able to manage your Diabetes without too much strife.

When looking at how to adjust your diet you may come up with some questions regarding specific types of food. Being diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes does not mean that you cannot indulge in the foods that you have previously enjoyed. In fact, sushi is probably one of the most speculated foods for those dealing with diabetes. So, Is Sushi Okay for Someone with Type 2 Diabetes?

Sushi has become more and more popular. Part of that popularity is due to the nutritional values in sushi. Sushi is chocked full of lean proteins and vegetables. Not only that, but sushi is an incredibly beautiful type of food. There is something incredibly fun about eating it, and it has become a culinary wave that has been sweeping the nation.

However, those who suffer from Type 2 Diabetes need to approach sushi with a bit of caution. Those who are diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes typically have diets that are full of high glucose foods that cause their blood sugar to be off kilter. White rice is a perfect example of those high glucose foods that can prove detrimental to your blood sugar levels. Most traditional pieces of nigiri sushi and sushi rolls are constructed with a fair amount of this rice. It is important that you take into account how much of that rice you are eating when you are having sushi. Additionally, not all rolls are constructed with healthy ingredients. In fact, you will often find some very elaborate rolls that are filled with fried ingredients or heavily sugared sauces.

There is an exception to this logic within the realm of sushi. Sashimi, is actually sushi without the rice. This is a perfect option for those who tend to have a diet that is too rich in high glycemic foods.

So the answer to the question “Is Sushi Okay for Someone with Type 2 Diabetes?” is yes and no. Yes, sushi is a healthy alternative to other types of foods. However, you have to be careful about it because there are hidden health dangers in it. As with most foods, the key is to eat in moderation. Too much of anything can never be good for you!

Type 2 Diabetes – What Does Eating in Moderation Mean to You?

In theory, "eat in moderation" sounds like great advice. But is it useful in practice? Let us not forget most information is tailored for a general audience. As such, it may be watered down when applied to your particular situation. Therefore, it pays to explore further the notion of "eating in moderation" so you can either make the most of this piece of advice or discard it should it prove a waste of time for you.

Type 2 diabetics or those trying to lose weight are most likely to resonate with this idea. Eating in moderation sounds confident and may seem like a fruitful endeavor. After all, extremes tend to be harmful, particularly in regards to eating habits and nutrition. Eat too much, and you gain weight, eat too little and struggle endlessly just to lose a few pounds. Even if there is a benefit to temporary caloric deprivation, it just makes burnout a more likely scenario.

The last thing you need as a Type 2 diabetic is to get off track just when you were making improvements with your blood sugar readings and weight loss. It takes time to shed unnecessary body fat for good and see high blood sugar levels lower and stabilize, so it is better to be patient and do things right the first time. But is moderation the key to success?

In short, the answer is yes and no. Eating in moderation is beneficial when you are choosing to eat the right foods. There is no point to moderation if you are using it as an excuse to eat anything despite your high blood sugar levels or excess body weight.

For example, chips have an exorbitant amount of fat and have no place in an eating plan geared for weight loss. Similarly, sodas are a disaster for anyone with Type 2 diabetes considering they give a dangerous blood sugar spike while supplying the body with nothing useful. Regardless of moderation, consuming such products is harmful and serves no use beyond satisfying a transient craving that needs to be suppressed.

"Everything's fine in moderation" sounds like something we want to hear, but you will do well to steer away from it if your health is not in great standing. That said, this does not mean you have to cut your favorite foods from your diet completely. Rather, you should forget about moderation. Having your favorite dessert from time to time is okay – finding a way to consume it daily is not! It is necessary to have a balance but striving for moderation tends to be a justification that makes you slip up more often than not.