Diabetes Symptoms – Early Symptoms of Diabetes, Diet, Facts and Info

The early symptoms of diabetes are often taken for granted as the norm. Diabetes (type 2 specifically) is at an all time high in the United States door to a number of various factors such as environment, work habits and poor diet. It is said that today’s nine-to-five lifestyle of the average American is the breeding ground for this disease. So how does one stay safe from this disease when it is so common among today’s adults? The key is in early detection of the symptoms of diabetes and taking action in order to make a healthy change.

So what are the common diabetes symptoms?

The common diabeties symptoms include the following: excessive thirst, frequent urination, extreme weightloss or gain, highly increased fatigue, irritability, increased hunger, blurry vision, confusion, upon many other symptoms of diabeties. One extremely important thing to consider is that these symptoms do not mean you have diabetes, they are simply warning signs and should be used as “red flags” in order to get checked out by a medical professional. In other words, it is common for everyone to experience one or more of theses symptoms every now and then, but should not be ignored either. If these symptoms persist or come back repeatedly or if you experience more than one of these diabetes symptoms at a time, it may be time to visit the doctor to get tested.

Only a medical professional can diagnose whether or not you have diabetes through simple blood tests. The key to treatment is early detection. In addition, preventative maintenance is key to not falling victim to this disease. In addition, diabetes can be inherited through other family members. If you have a history of diabetes within your family, you may be at greater risk for this disease.

What is a proper diabetes diet?

There is a vast amount of information available on the topic of diabetes diets. As a rule of thumb, you should eat the way most medical professionals would want you to eat normally. The diabetes diet is considered quite possibly, the healthiest way to eat. Diabetics should eat small portions throughout the day, a healthy breakfast and a diet of regulated carbs as a routine. Many diabetics take cinnamon supplements as cinnomon can help regulate blood/sugar levels in the body. It is highly suggested that if you currently have diabetes, that you get involved in your own study of the disease and take part in programs that can help you cope and treat your disease.

If you don’t have diabetes, but you may be at risk, there is no other time like the present to take action to ensure that you do not become afflicted with diabetes. This is your best chance at avoiding the risks associated with this disease. If you think you may be at risk, there is no time like the present to start making changes in your diet and lifestyle to avoid further declination in your health.

Studies have also shown that not getting enough sleep also contributes to your chances of getting diabetes, and those who have diabetes, it is more important than ever to get enough restful sleep every night. Sleep is highly under-rated in today’s society but lack of sleep can easily cause a multitude of long-term health problems and should be taken seriously. Like sleep, exercise, even a short walk every day, can greatly increase your health and put you further away from the risks associated with diabetes.

Is there a diabetes cure?

This is a highly argued topic as the diabetes symptoms can be suppressed so much that they are almost, if not completely, undetectable. There are many programs online that use a variety of methods that can do such things. The generals are completely important; sleep, diet and exercise are key! Like mentioned before, it is highly recommended in getting in to a diabetes treatment program as to progressively attack this disease head-on.

The best thing you can do whether you have diabetes, know someone that has diabetes, or are at-risk for diabetes, is get informed, get educated and take action towards better health.

Symptoms of the Onset of Diabetes

The most common symptom my patients have of the onset of diabetes is: none!

Most of my patients are adults who I see on a regular basis, many of whom receive blood testing periodically. Patients who are at risk for diabetes – who are overweight or have a family history of diabetes – are often diagnosed on routine blood tests done for other reasons. Usually these patients exhibit no specific symptoms.

Historically, excess thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, and increased hunger have been cited as classic diagnostic signs. Sweet tasting urine is another, but modern day doctors rarely use this diagnostic test. (Most doctors don’t know how regular urine tastes, anyway.) The latin words, diabetes mellitus, mean “run-through honey.”

However, by the time a patient’s blood sugar is high enough to cause these symptoms, diabetes is usually quite advanced.

What causes thirst and frequent urination in a diabetic? The kidney normally is capable of absorbing all the glucose that flows through it. However, above a certain threshold, usually around a blood sugar of 200 to 300 mg/dL, the kidney can no longer absorb all the blood glucose, resulting in the sugar “spilling” into the urine. Glucose in the urine acts as a diuretic, causing increased volume of urination and therefore increased urinary frequency.

Because some of the calories from diet run right through a patient with diabetes, weight loss can occur, especially in children with Type I diabetes. Type I diabetic children tend to be thin and eat more to make up for what they are losing. Most Type II diabetics (which accounts for most adult diabetes) are overweight to begin with and may not exhibit weight loss. Some are happy if weight loss occurs and therefore delay seeking medical attention. Type II diabetes is no longer a disease limited to adults. Overweight teens and pre-teens are also at risk.

The current definition of diabetes is a fasting blood glucose reading of only 126 mg/dL, much lower than the level where patients exhibit the above symptoms. However, recognizing subtler symptoms of diabetes may lead to the diagnosis at blood sugar levels below those that produce thirst and frequent urination. Sometimes a patient will complain of fatigue (mental or physical). In women, recurrent vaginal yeast infections or a yeast skin rash under the breast may be associated with diabetes. Occasionally men complain of a yeast rash in the groin area. Some patients describe mild discomfort urinating or a change in vision.

The laboratory definition of diabetes has changed over the past few decades, with the threshold for diagnosis dropping lower and lower. Along with this, treatment goals for blood sugar now aim at normal or nearly normal blood glucose levels. With our improved understanding of how obesity leads to diabetes, insulin resistance is now recognized as a pre-diabetic condition.

Rather than wait for symptoms to occur, if you are at risk for diabetes, check with your doctor, who may want to perform simple blood testing. Or take advantage of your local health fair or chain pharmacies, who often offer free diabetic testing.

Copyright 2010 Cynthia J. Koelker, MD

Diabetic Symptoms – These High Blood Sugar Symptoms Can Mean Diabetes

High blood sugar symptoms can be sign of diabetes, a serious condition, that – if not treated – can lead to devastating consequences to your health, including kidney failure, heart attack, stroke, blindness, and diabetic coma.

However, the most common symptom of high blood sugar is having no symptoms at all! Which is why many people are living with diabetes without knowing about it!

Because of this fact, it's very important that you test your blood glucose levels on a regular basis using a blood glucose analyzer and also to be aware of the following high blood sugar symptoms.

But first, let me explain what it means to have "high blood sugar" or hyperglycemia. One is considered to have hyperglycemia, when one's blood glucose level elevates and stays elevated above the normal levels. Normal glucose levels are between 70 and 150 mg / dL. Levels typically are lower in the morning, when you wake up after a whole night of fasting, and increase after meals.

Levels rising consistently above 150 mg / dL are indicative of hyperglycemia.

If your blood glucose level is too high, you may experience the following symptoms:

– Increased thirst- it seams that you are always thirsty
– Frequent urination – you constantly have to go to the bathroom
– Dry mouth
– Nausea
– Vomiting
– Shortness of breath
– Extreme fatigue, feeling weak and tired
– Difficulty concentrating
– Blurred vision
– Slower healing of wounds
– Unexplained weight loss
– Frequent yeast infections
– Blood sugar higher than 180 mg / dL

It is important to know that not everyone with high blood glucose levels will experience the exact same symptoms. If your symptoms are not severe, you may feel normal and not think that may you have high blood sugar. Also, your symptoms can be very mild or develop at an extremely slow pace. Some people do not experience any symptoms at all. That is why it is important to pay attention to your body, and have blood sugar levels checked periodically.

The good news is that while diabetes is a serious and potentially devastating disease, it is also highly preventable. Even if you already have it, you can control the symptoms or reverse the disease entirely, with a few simple changes to your lifestyle. Because diabetes is caused mainly by poor diet choices, lack of or insufficient physical activity, and stress; simply by improving your diet, exercising, and eliminating stress from your life, can have a profound effect for your health!