Type 2 Diabetes – The Effect of Phenylalanine on Blood Sugar

Although Type 2 diabetes is typically controlled using a variety of medications, diet and exercise, this is still sometimes not enough for some individuals to lead a normal lifestyle. Following these types of strict mandates is often too challenging and overwhelming, leaving significant opportunity for failure. That’s why some Type 2 diabetics have turned to more natural treatments that do not offer side effects and are easier to manage. One of these is phenylalanine.

There are many supplements on the market that are as effective as phenylalanine, but have been given much more exposure. Even though this supplement has helped many Type 2 diabetics lower their blood sugar, there are still diabetics who remain largely unaware of its existence.

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that has shown promising capabilities of helping to control blood sugar levels in Type 2 diabetics. Although it is not a complete formula for success, it offers many diabetics an alternative to using prescription medications. Having this additional choice is helpful for many who experience side effects while taking anti-diabetic drugs.

What is the overall purpose of phenylalanine? This amino acid is a building block, essential for the formation of protein. This amino acid is found in many common foods including, but not limited to fish, poultry and eggs.

There are three different types of phenylalanine. One type, L-phenylalanine, is naturally found in the body. The two others forms, D-phenylalanine and DL-phenylalanine, have to be synthetically manufactured. DL-phenylalanine is the result of combining one-half of phenylalanine and one-half D-phenylalanine.

The preferred method for taking this supplement is to do so immediately before eating. This allows it to help manage blood sugar levels while you eat, and immediately afterwards, by stimulating an increased production of insulin.

But phenylalanine is not for everyone. Some individuals who try this supplement may be at risk of lowering their blood sugar levels too far. For this reason, anyone interested in giving it a try needs to be cleared by their doctor according to their medical history and the state of their Type 2 diabetes. Plus, you will need to be advised of a recommended dosage.

Although natural supplements have proven to be beneficial for many Type 2 diabetics, they are not for every diabetic. And they should never be taken in place of medications prescribed by a doctor. If you are interested in giving phenylalanine a try, you will want to talk to your doctor first. He can instruct you as to whether this supplement is right for you. It is also recommended diabetics not skip or stop their prescription drugs until they have consulted with their doctor.

Blood Sugar Levels: Trucking Through the Confusion

As the trucking industry continues to lure new drivers into the vocation with promises of high pay and an exciting career, the fact remains that with a pitiful average annual salary of just $38,000 and fourteen hour work days, a driver can easily work thousands of hours per year and only average a rate of just over $8.00 per hour.

Combine this with the lack of proper sleep and rest, poor choices in healthy meals availability, coupled with the overall social abnormalities of the lifestyle, it is no wonder that professional truck driving is considered by many health experts as one of the deadliest jobs in America.

As the industry focuses on the importance of moving the freight on time, drivers are pushed to grabbing high calorie, carbohydrate junk food for a quick snack, often having to eat it down while still running down the road. Thanks to the 14 hour rule, it is estimated that diabetes among truck drivers is increasing.

When one searches for a guideline to proper blood sugar levels, various charts can be found with very different ranges, leaving many in a state of confusion:

  • Source 1:

Fasting = 70-110

1 hour after meal = 90-150

2 hours after meal = 80-140

3 hours after meal = 60-110

This same source also advises the following “Acceptable” ranges:

Fasting = 60-120

1 hour after meal = 80-180

2 hours after meal = 70-150

3 hours after meal = 60-130

  • Source 2:

Fasting = 80-140

1 hour after meal = 100-160

2 hours after meal = Less than 180

  • Source 3:

Fasting = 70-100

2 hours after meal = 70-140

This source also provides changes in the blood sugar levels, depending on your age:

2 hours after meal:

· Less than 140 (50 and younger)

· Less than 150 (50-60)

· Less than 160 (60 and older)

A well-known leading source for diabetes list the normal fasting range as 70-130 but yet, if the reading is higher than 126, then a diagnosis of diabetes is made. After 1-2 hours of a meal, they show the range to be less than 180. They continue to state that during a “random” test, if the reading is 200 or higher, then diabetes is also diagnosed.

I decided to put these charts to the test and after taking my own personal fasting reading, my sugar level showed to be 112, placing me as “in control” in the above example as well as per source two, but not “in control” per source one and three, although according to source one, the 112 reading is “acceptable.”

One hour after eating a high sugar meal, my level came in at 235 and according to the above example as in all sources, placing me as high or “not in control.” Two hours after eating, my level showed to be 127, “in control” by all above sources.

Finally, after three hours from my last meal, my blood glucose reading was 109, acceptable with all above sources… except by one final guideline.

Blood Glucose Levels Confusion

All of my readings, every single one, from fasting to three hours after a meal are shown to be high or “not in control” by yet another guideline provided by the American Truck Drivers Diabetes Association.

To wrap up the final results of my tests, my fasting reading failed per source one but at the same time, was “acceptable.” It also was acceptable via source two, but failed per source three and was fine with the leading source but failed with the ATDDA.

My one hour reading failed per all sources and the two and three-hour readings were acceptable by all sources other than the ATDDA.

So what exactly are the normal control ranges for blood glucose levels in diabetics? According to the ATDDA, the confusion lies with the attempt to separate normal blood sugar levels between diabetics and non-diabetics.

They contend that normal glucose levels are the same for both individuals:

Fasting = 70-90

1 hour after meal = 140 or less

2 hours after meal = 120 or less

3 hours after meal = Under 100

High blood sugar levels lead to the complications in diabetics, not having diabetes itself. These complications include heart and kidney disease, stroke, neuropathy, blindness and amputation. Many of these varied guidelines are not as strict for maintaining lower blood sugar levels nor do they take into account the abnormal lifestyle of the professional trucker.

Following a guideline that is closer to what a diabetic’s blood sugar level should be, will greatly reduce the risks for these complications. One should be concerned with staying as close to the “normal” range as possible, with that range being outlined by the ATDDA.

Diabetes – 5 Tips to Eat Sugar Wisely

Say you’re diabetic but have a sweet tooth. Are you doomed to a lifetime of deprivation, watching others enjoy but never partaking yourself? The surprising answer is no – at least for many Type II diabetics.

The reality is that most diabetics do eat sugar – and then feel guilty about it. Although as a physician I encourage my patients to avoid sweets and refined carbohydrates, I’m well aware that many do not. Complete abstinence is difficult, especially for premenopausal women, who often crave carbs on a cyclic basis.

Of course you hope to control your blood sugar, but everyone wants a piece of birthday cake now and then. What’s a person to do?

Here are 5 tips to eat sugar wisely.

1. Enjoy a little sugar in place of a different carb. Do you feel guilty about eating sugar but not mashed potatoes? Both raise your blood sugar about as quickly and about as much. If you are dying for dessert, skip the dinner rolls, the rice, the potatoes, the lemonade, the corn. After your healthy meal of lean meat and high-fiber vegetables, enjoy a 300-calorie dessert. If you keep your total calorie intake within a reasonable limit (1500 to 2000 calories for most people), eating sugar will affect your sugar little differently than other carbohydrates.

2. Enjoy an alcohol sugar. Although foods sweetened with alcohol sugars are not low in calories, they raise your blood sugar less quickly than those sweetened with regular sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. They also cause less tooth decay and less rebound craving for more sugar. Most foods labeled “no sugar added” contain alcohol sugars. Many varieties of no-sugar-added, reduced fat ice cream are available. Be careful not to eat too much, however, as this may cause diarrhea and may raise your blood sugar due to excess calories.

3. Enjoy a mix of sugar and an artificial sweetener. Much of the sugar we consume isn’t even tasted. There is a threshold for appreciating sweetness – for many people a little can go a long way. For instance, some people who claim they can’t abide a diet soda find that mixing in only a little regular soda with a diet soda makes the taste acceptable. Likewise, if you enjoy your coffee sweetened, try 1 teaspoon of sugar instead of 3, and substitute 2 teaspoons of an artificial sweetener – you may not be able to tell the difference.

4. Enjoy a little sugar with a meal instead of alone. One problem with eating sweets is that people often consume them alone, which causes an abrupt rise in blood sugar levels. If eaten along with a healthy meal of lean protein and low-calorie, high-fiber vegetables, the sugar will mix in with the other food, slowing the absorption and avoiding the immediate spike in blood glucose.

5. Enjoy a little sugar on instead of in a dessert. A lot of sugar within a dessert goes to waste, that is, it isn’t even tasted. Unless you take tiny bites, savoring each one as it melts on your tongue, it’s likely that over half the sweetness slips down your throat without encountering your taste buds. A piece of cake is high in calories, not only from sugar, but from flour (which turns to glucose in your body as quickly as sugar) and from fat (primarily in the icing). Rather than imbibe in a 400 calorie pastry, enjoy a heaping bowl of berries topped with a few spoonfuls of sugar. It’s unlikely you’ll use as much as a quarter cup of sugar, which contains under 200 calories.

Copyright ©2010 Cynthia J. Koelker, M.D.

Diabetic Symptoms – These High Blood Sugar Symptoms Can Mean Diabetes

High blood sugar symptoms can be sign of diabetes, a serious condition, that – if not treated – can lead to devastating consequences to your health, including kidney failure, heart attack, stroke, blindness, and diabetic coma.

However, the most common symptom of high blood sugar is having no symptoms at all! Which is why many people are living with diabetes without knowing about it!

Because of this fact, it's very important that you test your blood glucose levels on a regular basis using a blood glucose analyzer and also to be aware of the following high blood sugar symptoms.

But first, let me explain what it means to have "high blood sugar" or hyperglycemia. One is considered to have hyperglycemia, when one's blood glucose level elevates and stays elevated above the normal levels. Normal glucose levels are between 70 and 150 mg / dL. Levels typically are lower in the morning, when you wake up after a whole night of fasting, and increase after meals.

Levels rising consistently above 150 mg / dL are indicative of hyperglycemia.

If your blood glucose level is too high, you may experience the following symptoms:

– Increased thirst- it seams that you are always thirsty
– Frequent urination – you constantly have to go to the bathroom
– Dry mouth
– Nausea
– Vomiting
– Shortness of breath
– Extreme fatigue, feeling weak and tired
– Difficulty concentrating
– Blurred vision
– Slower healing of wounds
– Unexplained weight loss
– Frequent yeast infections
– Blood sugar higher than 180 mg / dL

It is important to know that not everyone with high blood glucose levels will experience the exact same symptoms. If your symptoms are not severe, you may feel normal and not think that may you have high blood sugar. Also, your symptoms can be very mild or develop at an extremely slow pace. Some people do not experience any symptoms at all. That is why it is important to pay attention to your body, and have blood sugar levels checked periodically.

The good news is that while diabetes is a serious and potentially devastating disease, it is also highly preventable. Even if you already have it, you can control the symptoms or reverse the disease entirely, with a few simple changes to your lifestyle. Because diabetes is caused mainly by poor diet choices, lack of or insufficient physical activity, and stress; simply by improving your diet, exercising, and eliminating stress from your life, can have a profound effect for your health!