Should Diabetics Eat Bagels?

Should bagels be added to the list of foods diabetics should avoid? Isn’t it bad enough to ban birthday cake and chocolate cream pie?

For many, bagels have long been considered a healthy food choice. Surely the chewy goodness is better for you than pasty white bread. But what if you learned it was worse?

Both bagels and white bread are made of flour, water, and a few other ingredients. The white flour in standard bagels is the same as that in white bread. Nowadays nearly everyone knows white bread is bad for diabetics. It raises blood glucose levels as quickly as table sugar.

So how could a bagel be worse than bread?

A single slice of white bread provides 60-80 calories in the form of carbohydrates. Two slices of toast or bread for a sandwich amounts to about 150 calories. But what about a bagel? A mini-bagel also provides about 150 calories, but a regular-size bagel has 250-300 calories, whereas one of the yummy over-size varieties can be as much as 500 calories! That’s how a bagel can be worse than bread. It’s unlikely you’d sit down and eat 7-8 slices of bread, but that’s exactly what you’re doing if you indulge in a large bagel.

All bagels are not created equal in other nutritional regards. For example, a whole wheat bagel may have about the same calories as a french toast bagel (250 to 300 calories), yet contain only a third as much sugar but three times the fiber. Whole grains take longer for the body to digest and therefore do not elevate the blood sugar as quickly. Dietary fiber improves bowel function and promotes a feeling of satiety (fullness after eating). A bagel loaded with melted cheese will be higher in fat than a blueberry or raisin bagel.

And what about toppings? Two tablespoons of reduced-fat cream cheese adds another 70 calories, not a bad choice for a light breakfast or lunch. However, two tablespoons of peanut butter (or butter, or mayonnaise-based spread) amounts to an additional 200 calories, most of which comes from fat. A better choice would be an equal serving of sugar-free preserves (as little as 10 calories per tablespoon) or a few slices of lean turkey breast (about 50 calories).

People like bagels largely due to the texture. It feels like you’re eating more when you have to chew more vigorously. That’s not a bad thing, especially for diabetics who feel deprived much of the time.

While it’s true a diabetic should avoid eating a giant bagel slathered with peanut butter (a 700 calorie feast), a whole-wheat mini-bagel with low-fat cream cheese provides less than half that many calories and is fair game for the famished female diabetic craving a carbohydrate fix.

Diabetes – 5 Tips to Eat Sugar Wisely

Say you’re diabetic but have a sweet tooth. Are you doomed to a lifetime of deprivation, watching others enjoy but never partaking yourself? The surprising answer is no – at least for many Type II diabetics.

The reality is that most diabetics do eat sugar – and then feel guilty about it. Although as a physician I encourage my patients to avoid sweets and refined carbohydrates, I’m well aware that many do not. Complete abstinence is difficult, especially for premenopausal women, who often crave carbs on a cyclic basis.

Of course you hope to control your blood sugar, but everyone wants a piece of birthday cake now and then. What’s a person to do?

Here are 5 tips to eat sugar wisely.

1. Enjoy a little sugar in place of a different carb. Do you feel guilty about eating sugar but not mashed potatoes? Both raise your blood sugar about as quickly and about as much. If you are dying for dessert, skip the dinner rolls, the rice, the potatoes, the lemonade, the corn. After your healthy meal of lean meat and high-fiber vegetables, enjoy a 300-calorie dessert. If you keep your total calorie intake within a reasonable limit (1500 to 2000 calories for most people), eating sugar will affect your sugar little differently than other carbohydrates.

2. Enjoy an alcohol sugar. Although foods sweetened with alcohol sugars are not low in calories, they raise your blood sugar less quickly than those sweetened with regular sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. They also cause less tooth decay and less rebound craving for more sugar. Most foods labeled “no sugar added” contain alcohol sugars. Many varieties of no-sugar-added, reduced fat ice cream are available. Be careful not to eat too much, however, as this may cause diarrhea and may raise your blood sugar due to excess calories.

3. Enjoy a mix of sugar and an artificial sweetener. Much of the sugar we consume isn’t even tasted. There is a threshold for appreciating sweetness – for many people a little can go a long way. For instance, some people who claim they can’t abide a diet soda find that mixing in only a little regular soda with a diet soda makes the taste acceptable. Likewise, if you enjoy your coffee sweetened, try 1 teaspoon of sugar instead of 3, and substitute 2 teaspoons of an artificial sweetener – you may not be able to tell the difference.

4. Enjoy a little sugar with a meal instead of alone. One problem with eating sweets is that people often consume them alone, which causes an abrupt rise in blood sugar levels. If eaten along with a healthy meal of lean protein and low-calorie, high-fiber vegetables, the sugar will mix in with the other food, slowing the absorption and avoiding the immediate spike in blood glucose.

5. Enjoy a little sugar on instead of in a dessert. A lot of sugar within a dessert goes to waste, that is, it isn’t even tasted. Unless you take tiny bites, savoring each one as it melts on your tongue, it’s likely that over half the sweetness slips down your throat without encountering your taste buds. A piece of cake is high in calories, not only from sugar, but from flour (which turns to glucose in your body as quickly as sugar) and from fat (primarily in the icing). Rather than imbibe in a 400 calorie pastry, enjoy a heaping bowl of berries topped with a few spoonfuls of sugar. It’s unlikely you’ll use as much as a quarter cup of sugar, which contains under 200 calories.

Copyright ©2010 Cynthia J. Koelker, M.D.

Fruits For Diabetes – What Fruits Can a Diabetic Eat?

Diabetic is a chronic disease causing health complications. The complications are tingling and numbness appearing in feet and hands. These also include vision problems and kidney failure. Diabetes is a risk prone towards heart disease, high blood pressure and strokes. To control high glucose level, people with diabetes fail to produce sufficient insulin or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes is based on genetics and type 2 is on diet and fatness. People with type 1 diabetes face difficulties to prevent, people with type 2 try to manage by dieting and exercising.

In macro sense, a good diet plan can help diabetes control the blood sugar levels. Fruits in a diet can naturally prevent diabetes. Colored fruits possess high anti-oxidant vitamins and fibers that let the blood sugar stabilize. It appears a false notion that diabetics should not have fruits. People with diabetes can have fiber- rich fruits including water million, strawberries, papaya, plums and muskmelon. These fruits can control blood sugar levels. Fresh lime supplies vitamins and minerals to the diabetics. On the contrary, fruit juices are to be restricted, because these contain much sugar.

In diet plan, it is better to avoid juice because it raises the blood sugar level. Mango, custard apples, banana and grapes contain high sugar ingredients and these fruits should not be included in the fruits group. Therefore, dry fruits possess high level of fat, and condensed energy so that these cannot be included in fruits group. Dates, the dark- colored oval fruits are to be excluded from the list of fruits, as because dates are rich in calories and be avoided by the diabetics. However, dried dates provide calcium and iron.

Hence, in moderation, diabetics may have apples, blueberries, cherries, kiwi fruit, pears, pineapples, mangoes, black currants. When you have 75 grams of any of these fruits, you will have 10 grams of carbohydrate. Similarly, to have 10 grams of carbohydrate, you have to consume 100 grams of guava, lemon, orange, papaya, peach, strawberries, or blackberries alternatively. One fifty grams of coconut meat, raspberries, or gooseberries can provide you ten grams of carbohydrate also. People with diabetics can adjust their fruits intake as per the requirement of the body. Fructose present in the fruits. Diabetics can have fruits like other healthy persons. The fruit, citrus contains manganese that is a useful ingredient for insulin. The western Ontario university has studied citrus possesses a flavonoid that contains insulin like properties. The flavonoid is also known as naringenin.

Even though fruits are permissible to the diabetics patients, excessive consumption of fruits can let the blood sugar level increase. You have to check the portion of the fruits always. Moderate consumption of fruits can control your blood sugar level.

Bitter melon is a traditional diabetic remedy in Far East. Bitter melon contains glucose absorption that increases insulin flow. It possesses insulin effectiveness also.

Onion group can help the blood sugar control. Garlic, leek, onion, and scallion belong to onion group.

Why Diabetics Should Eat Lots of Shrimp

Shrimp is one of the best food choices a diabetic can make. Here are some of the main reasons:

Shrimp Has LOTS of Omega-3 (Omega-3 Fatty Acids) and This Is Extremely Important To the Diabetic

Diabetics have damaged cell membranes. They are “insulin resistant” which means they don’t respond normally to insulin when it signals the cell to uptake glucose. Glucose can’t get across these damaged membranes at the normal rate, and therefore, this sugar builds up in the bloodstream reaping havoc with your body.

Repairing these membranes involves eliminating certain things from your diet, especially trans fat which gets subsituted into your cell membranes where the healthy omega-3’s should go. This damages your cell membranes and makes them too “stiff.” Even if you eliminate trans fat, if you don’t get enough omega-3, you won’t be able to repair and maintain those damaged cell membranes. Shrimp is one of the very best sources for omega-3.

Shrimp Has the Best Kind of Omega-3

There are several different types of omega-3.

First, there is a difference between plant derived omega-3 (ALA) and animal derived omega-3 (DHA and EPA). Humans can not use the plant version (ALA) without first converting it and we can only convert about 10% of what we eat. The rest is wasted. Also, diabetics and older people convert at even a lower rate. Therefore, it is best to eat the animal form of omega-3 which we can more easily use.

Second, the omega-3 in shrimp and other crustaceans (a type of arthropod) is attached to a phospholipid molecule. This is exactly what is found in the membranes of humans and is easier for the body to absorb than when it’s attached to triglyceride molecule like you find in fish.

Shrimp Is Very High In Protein, Very Low In Fat, and Contains Virtually No Carb

Each bite of succulent shrimp is packed with protein and hardly any fat. Plus, it has virually no carb. Since diabetics need to lower their carb intake and increase their protein intake, this makes the composition of shrimp meat perfect for the diabetic.

You Don’t Need To Worry About the Cholesterol Thing

Shrimp got a very undeserved bad rap regarding cholesterol. Yes, it is true that shrimp meat contains cholesterol BUT it is extremely low in saturated fat which is actually what raises cholesterol in humans. In fact, eating shrimp actually raises the good cholesterol.

Shrimp Tastes Great – What a Treat!

Most diabetics have to give up or at least drastically reduce some of their favorite foods. However, here’s a food that is simply wonderful in taste and is almost always thought of as quite a treat that is simply perfect for the diabetic to eat. Thank you Mother Nature!